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Burn-in revisited

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R66 View Drop Down
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Joined: 18 May 2021
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R66 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2021 at 9:53am
Hi Ash, Why would Audio cables be subject to "Hi voltage flash testing" because if they are not changes to a piece of wires Molecular structure during manufacture is still a possibility. I cant engage on a science level but just bending a wire back and forth changes its structure.

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Ash View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ash Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2021 at 7:11pm
I reckon subjecting an extruded conductor to a very strong electric field (high voltage, high energy per unit charge) could affect net dipole alignment or net dipole moment in the conductor. Not that the size/magnitude of the signal would vary at all going one way instead of the other but I reckon it could affect timing of the signal. It could cause phase shift, not loss of amplitude. Signals are alternating currents but they aren't necessarily symmetrical across the x-axis.

High voltage flash testing is an industrial safety test for the insulation around wires when they are made, to make sure that electrical faults don't allow the insulation to ionise and become conductive of high currents and cause harm/death, I guess. I would have to read more, this is just conjecture. I have no evidence.

Also, mechanically bending a metal isn't going to alter dipole arrangement.

Bottom line is I'm not a researcher so I have no idea about dipole moments in copper.


Edited by Ash - 20 May 2021 at 7:45pm
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